The Ethics of Lawyers Recording Conversations

Canadians’ interest in legal ethics continues to remain very high.  What, then, are the ethics of a lawyer’s secret recording of a telephone call with a client, including the employees of a client? Rule 7.2-3 of the Ontario Rules of Professional Conduct provides: 7.2-3 A lawyer shall not use any device to record a conversation between the lawyer… Read More

Why re-elect me or vote for anyone in the LSO #BencherElection2019

Voting in the Law Society bencher elections is an act of faith performed every four years.  Most of us keep Osgoode Hall a wide berth, unless we have scheduled an appearance in court or attend a networking event. Nevertheless, there is always a buzz in the legal media about election platforms, with candidates promising to… Read More

Cabinet Confidentiality: Navigating the Procedural Ins and Outs

What is cabinet confidentiality?  How does it restrict what a minister of the Crown can reveal in public discourse?  How can a court, tribunal or parliamentary committee compel disclosure, and how can that process be blocked? Cabinet confidentiality is a feature of Canadian constitutional law derived from Part III of the Constitution Act, 1867, in which… Read More

Talking to the Attorney-General about Solicitor-Client Privilege

Out of the blue, solicitor-client privilege is a meme.  The subject excites legal ethics nerds but is not recommended dinner-party conversation.  Until now. If the public weren’t confused enough by this legal principle, a former Attorney-General hires a retired Supreme Court judge as her legal counsel.  The former minister declines comment to reporters on the… Read More

Is it time to unshackle law schools from law societies?

On December 10, 2018, the Law Society of Ontario chose to stay the course on its dual streams for lawyer licencing.  Apart from a few substantive enhancements such as the requirement for paid internships, a candidate for membership in the legal profession must either article under an approved lawyer or pursue an experiential education program… Read More

The Trial of Hillary Clinton, the Lawyer and Woman

“The episode is one of … America’s most notorious cases of mass hysteria. It has been used in political rhetoric and popular literature as a vivid cautionary tale about the dangers of isolationism, religious extremism, false accusations, and lapses in due process.” No, this is not a future historian’s description of yesterday’s election of the… Read More

A Science Manual for Canadian Judges. Who knew we all had to read it?

This summer, while researching for a paper on the Canadian law of causation in the age of torts committed in cyberspace, I re-read the Science Manual for Canadian Judges (Manual).  A 2013 project of the Canadian National Judicial Institute, the Manual was intended to fill a much-needed lacuna in our legal system.  Most lawyers are awful scientists.  So… Read More