Tagged future of law

From Law Office to lawPod : The Apple-ization of McCarthys

Yesterday’s Globe and Mail reported, in ‘McCarthy Tétrault’s Tracie Crook leading firm’s radical transformation,’ that the day of the partner’s corner office may one day be relegated to history.  By inverting the traditional office, partners will now occupy fish tanks in the middle of the office, surrounded by exchangeable stations in an open concept work space for support staff, junior lawyers and students.  In adopting this model, the firm evidently made a conscious decision to reinvent the law practice as a creative endeavour, rather than a technical one.  The extent to which lawyers are applied philosophers or glorified clerks, or a combination of the…

An iTunes for law? Think the unthinkable retail experience.

As shoppers file past the packaged meat counter at a Korean Tesco’s built into a subway platform, brings the groceries to commuters, then delivers them to their homes.  The virtual grocery, sort of like iTunes for those who want the record store browsing experience, might give us a glimpse of the law firm of the future. Never has the market for legal services been so mismatched.  The courts, especially in family law, are bursting at the seams with pro se litigants.  Firms, on the other hand, resist cutting back on essentials like supper club memberships for partners.  The reality is…

Your future in Criminal Law

Twenty-five years from now, historians, criminologists and other observers of criminal law in Canada may very well look back to a 2005 lecture given by Justice Michael Moldaver (now of the Supreme Court of Canada), to the Criminal Lawyers Association.  Will they ask, why did we not see the symptoms of a dying branch of our profession? (la version française suit) The important excerpt from the lecture, quoted at the opening of a comprehensive report by the Ontario courts on criminal procedure, pointed to a trial process spiraling out of control.  He repeated his call to action in a 2006…

Do more than save articling – reinvent the lawyer

During the 1990’s, corporate clients wanted law firms to employ more junior lawyers to complete their work at lower hourly rates.  During the first decade of this century, the same clients started telling firms not to use them on their files. (la version française suit) The actual demand for legal services is as vibrant as ever.  There is simply less demand for new lawyers and junior partners.  The lack of forward thinking is directly that of management consultants and accountants who, post-Enron, have brainwashed corporations into believing law is a commodity instead of a competitive advantage.  Down the road, there…