Write about law, like a pro

(la version française suit)

In her mind, the request will kill two birds with one stone: clients will know the firm’s members are current about the latest developments in the law, and it’ll be a good opportunity to see if you have what it takes to write reports directly to clients.  Let’s face it, young lawyers are not known for their writing prowess.  Senior lawyers have told me incessantly that new lawyers cannot spell, let alone string two sentences together.  “This is a test!” you have to say to yourself.  And it is.  This is your chance to get noticed – so grab it.

Most case comments are dull

There is no point writing for the public, if the reader needs to hire a lawyer to make sense of it.  As a lawyer, you want to inform.  As a business person, you want to whet clients’ appetites, to make them consider calling your office about the problems on their desks.  There is no point in writing to be understood only by other lawyers.  In fact, writing for other lawyers should not make them work like lawyers to understand what you’re saying.

Most case summaries or commentaries written by lawyers for public consumption tend to be as dry as dust, out of fear of making errors.  Or they have been beaten into pulp by a firm editor used to “drafting” and not writing.  As a result, a piece intended to help clients understand they might need to hire a lawyer ends up losing the reader’s attention.  Whether you are a corporate law associate or a Supreme Court judge, writing is an act of persuasion.  To be persuasive, your writing has to appeal to both logic and emotion.  Old-school journalists invented the art of capturing a reader’s attention and conveying the facts within 15 to 30 inches of newspaper column.  Can you do that with a run-of-the mill Supreme Court decision which did not make it into the Toronto Star?

Mastering the ‘Lede’

The most important part of a story is the lede.  (That’s a misspelled form of the word “lead,” typographically altered circa 1965 to distinguish this meaning from the molten lead used in typesetting machines.)  For a journalist, a lede is a technical marvel.  A good one can mesmerize a reader into thinking the rest of the story is riveting.  Usually that effect is enough to carry the reader for about 10 inches—meaning the end better be good, too.  The classic form of the lede is the “four graph lede.”  A “graph” can be a paragraph but can be the constituent parts of a well-crafted longer paragraph.  They are distinct portions of an introduction which appeal to the human brain’s ability to (1) notice the story, (2) understand it, (3) recognize its importance and then (4) emotionally desire to know more.

Elements of the Four-Graph Lede

The first graph should be a matter-of-fact statement.  Journalists think in terms of the Four W’s of writing: Who did What, Where, and When.  The classic news story is a fire or bank robbery.  Here is my retelling of the historical case of the return of Toronto bank robber Ewin Boyd (pictured above), from serving in the Canadian Forces in World War II:

“Edwin Boyd robbed a Toronto branch of the Bank of Montreal with a gun on September 9, 1949.”

The second graph should add flesh to the first, or paint a vivid picture.

“Boyd, a convict, had just returned from active service fighting Hitler’s forces.  He held up the branch while drunk with a German Luger pistol.  The gunman escaped with $3,000.”

Then third graph is actually the hook explaining why the story is relevant to the reader.  Despite its weak position in the sequence, often overlooked as ‘filler,’ its importance as a transition piece is that it appeals to the reader’s rational mind by giving them a logical reason to read further.

“Police have warned that Boyd remains at large and is considered ‘armed and dangerous.’”

The fourth graph should light up the story with a quote or other testamentary anchor.  There is nothing like a good quote or a dramatic new statistic to give the reader an emotional impetus to continue reading.  It is for this reason that reporters, when interviewing you, will always seek out a good quote.  This is what I mean:

“He handed me a folded cheque.  When I opened it, it read: HOLD-UP. If you don’t want to be a dead hero, fill this sack with money,” said teller Mavis Beacon.  “I called the manager.  He asked him whether this was a joke, and he pulled out a gun and pointed it at him.”

Put it all together and you might get:

Edwin Boyd robbed a Toronto branch of the Bank of Montreal with a gun on September 9, 1949.  Boyd, a convict, had just returned from active service fighting Hitler’s forces.  He held up the branch while drunk with a German Luger pistol.  The gunman escaped with $3,000.  Police have warned that Boyd remains at large and is considered ‘armed and dangerous.’  “He handed me a folded cheque.  When I opened it, it read: HOLD-UP. If you don’t want to be a dead hero, fill this sack with money,” said teller Mavis Beacon.  “I called the manager.  He asked him whether this was a joke, and he pulled out a gun and pointed it at him.”

Applying the style to your legal article or case comment

Getting back to your web article about a recent legal development, a bit of practice will prove that the stylistic elements of a legal story are no different from a bank robbery or a four-alarm fire.  Instead of a technical monograph on the nuances of a recent Supreme Court decision, why not appeal to the ability of lay people, including sophisticated corporate clients, to understand a legal news story if put into clear, non-technical terms:

The Supreme Court of Canada handed down its ruling in Progressive Homes v. Lombard, on September 23, 2010.  The decision may have presented the top court its last opportunity to consider British Columbia’s ‘leaky condo’ litigation as a backdrop for clarifying the law of liability insurance exclusions.  We at Smart Law LLP have been following this case closely for the construction industry, because our clients have been telling us insurers have tightened up their interpretation of exclusion clauses for faulty workmanship claims.  “We were very concerned the Supreme Court might leave many of our clients without insurance coverage,” Smart Law LLP senior partner Nancy Smart told a gathering of the Ontario Bar Association’s Construction Law Section.  “We can now breathe a sigh of relief.  The Supreme Court has given us a roadmap to respond to recent trends in insurance company denials and reservations of rights.”

♦      ♦      ♦

Un associé senior vous a demandé d’écrire un article pour le site Internet du cabinet au sujet d’un arrêt récent suprême du Canada.

A son avis, la demande aura deux buts: les clients sauront que les membres du cabinet se sont informé au sujet des derniers développements en droit, et ce sera une bonne occasion pour voir si vous avez ce qu’il faut pour écrire des rapports directement  aux clients. Hélas, les jeunes avocats ne sont pas connus pour leurs prouesses d’écriture. En fait, les avocats plus chevronnés ont tendance à se plaindre sans cesse que les nouveaux avocats ne pouvez pas orthographier, et encore moins chaîner deux phrases ensemble.  « Ceci est un test! » vous devez dire à vous-même. Et il en est. Ceci est votre chance de vous faire remarquer – il est donc un moment à saisir.

La plupart des cas, les commentaires sont ternes

Pourquoi écrit-on pour le public, si le lecteur a besoin d’embaucher un avocat pour lui donner du sens? En tant que juriste, vous voulez informer, et vous voulez aiguiser l’appétit pour vous envoyer un dossier. Il ne sert à rien si vous n’écrivez que pour être compris par d’autres avocats. La plupart des commentaires écrits par des avocats pour la consommation publique ont tendance à être plus sec que la poussière. Ou ils ont été battus en pâte par un éditeur du même cabinet habitué à la « rédaction » et non l’écriture. En conséquence, un article, destiné à aider les clients à comprendre qu’ils pourraient avoir besoin d’embaucher un avocat, finit par perdre l’attention du lecteur. Que vous soyez un employé en droit des sociétés ou un juge de la Cour suprême, l’écriture est un acte de persuasion. Pour être convaincant, votre écriture doit faire appel à la fois à la logique et à l’émotion. Les journalistes ont inventé l’art de capter l’attention d’un lecteur et de les captiver dans les 15 à 30 pouces de colonne d’un journal. Pouvez-vous le faire avec un arrêt de la Cour suprême?

Maîtrisez le « lede »

La partie la plus importante de l’histoire est la « lede. » (C’est une forme mal orthographié du mot anglais pour ‘plomb’, typographiquement modifié c. 1965 pour distinguer ce sens à partir du plomb fondu utilisé dans les machines de composition typographique.) Pour un journaliste, une lede est une merveille technique. Une bonne peut hypnotiser un lecteur et le faire penser que le reste de l’histoire est fascinant. Habituellement cet effet est suffisant pour supporter le lecteur d’environ 10 pouces de lecture. La forme classique de la lede est la « lede en quatre graphes. » Le “graphe” peut être un paragraphe, mais peuvent être des morceaux d’un paragraphe. Ils sont les parties distinctes d’une introduction qui font appel à la capacité du cerveau humain à (1) se rendre compte, (2) comprendre, (3) reconnaître l’importance d’une histoire et (4) désirer d’en savoir plus.

Eléments de la lede en quatre graphes

Le premier graphique devrait être une déclaration de faits. Les journalistes pensent en termes des Quatre questions de la rédaction: Qui fait quoi, , et quand. L’histoire journalistique et classique est une incendie ou une vol de banque. Voici mon récit de l’affaire historique du retour de Edwin Boyd  (photo ci-dessus), après son tour dans les Forces canadiennes en la Seconde Guerre mondiale:

« Edwin Boyd a dévalisé une succursale de Toronto de la Banque de Montréal avec un pistolet le 9 Septembre 1949. »

Le deuxième graphe devrait ajouter les détails à la première, ou peindre une image vivante.

« Boyd, un condamné qui venait de rentrer du service actif des forces combattantes contre Hitler, s’est présenté en état d’ivresse avec un pistolet allemand Luger et s’échappa avec 3000 $. »

Le troisième graphe est en fait le crochet, en expliquant pourquoi l’histoire est pertinente pour le lecteur. Malgré sa position de faiblesse dans la séquence, souvent négligée comme ‘remplissage,’ son importance est qu’elle fait appel à l’esprit rationnel du lecteur en leur donnant une raison logique à lire davantage.

« La police a averti le publique que Boyd est toujours en fuite et est considéré comme armé et dangereux. »

Le quatrième graphe devrait éclairer l’histoire avec une déclaration ou tout autre point d’ancrage testamentaire. Il n’y a rien comme une bonne citation ou une statistique dramatique nouvelle, de lancer une impulsion émotionnelle à continuer la lecture. C’est pour cette raison que les journalistes, quand ils vous interviewent, cherchera toujours une bonne citation.

« Il m’a remis un chèque plié. Lorsque je l’ai ouvert, j’ai lu: HOLD-UP. Si vous ne voulez pas être une héroine morte, remplissez ce sac avec de l’argent, » a déclaré Mavis Beacon, caissière. « J’ai appelé le directeur. Il lui a demandé si c’était une blague, et il a sorti une arme qu’il a pointée sur lui. »

Mettez tout cela ensemble et vous pourriez obtenir:

« Edwin Boyd a dévalisé une succursale de Toronto de la Banque de Montréal avec un pistolet le 9 Septembre 1949. Boyd, un condamné qui venait de rentrer du service actif des forces combattantes contre Hitler, s’est présenté en état d’ivresse avec un pistolet allemand Luger et s’échappa avec 3000 $.  La police a averti le publique que Boyd est toujours en fuite et est considéré comme armé et dangereux.  « Il m’a remis un chèque plié. Lorsque je l’ai ouvert, j’ai lu: HOLD-UP. Si vous ne voulez pas être une héroine morte, remplissez ce sac avec de l’argent, a déclaré Mavis Beacon, caissière. — J’ai appelé le directeur. Il lui a demandé si c’était une blague, et il a sorti une arme qu’il a pointée sur lui. »

Appliquer ce style à votre article juridiques ou commentaire

Pour en revenir à votre article web sur un arrêt récente de la Cour suprême, un peu de pratique se révélera que les éléments stylistiques d’une histoire juridique ne sont pas différents d’un vol de banque ou d’un incendie de quatre alarmes. Au lieu d’une monographie technique sur les nuances d’une décision récente de la Cour suprême, pourquoi ne pas appeler à la capacité des laïcs, y compris une clientèle exigeante des entreprises, de comprendre une histoire, si les nouvelles juridiques mises en claires, en termes non-techniques:

« La Cour suprême du Canada a rendu sa décision dans Progressive Homes c. Lombard, le 23 Septembre 2010. L’arrêt représentait la dernière occasion pour le plus haut tribunal de considérer les litiges en Colombie-Britannique dans les affaires leaky condo pour clarifier la loi concernant les exclusions d’assurance de responsabilité civile. Nous chez Smart Law SRL avons suivi cette affaire de près pour l’industrie de la construction, parce que beaucoup de nos clients nous disent que les assureurs ont durci leur interprétation des clauses d’exclusion pour les réclamations.  « Nous étions très inquiets que la Cour suprême pourrait laisser beaucoup de nos clients sans couverture d’assurance, » a dit Nancy Smart, associé principal, à un rassemblement de la Section du droit de construciton de l’Association du Barreau de l’Ontario.  « Nous pouvons maintenant souffler un soupir de soulagement. La Cour suprême nous a expliqué comment répondre effectivement aux tendances récentes de compagnies d’assurance. »

Terms of use / Mentions légales

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s